4.7 Learning the muscles

This article is part of the Draw Life Beautifully online course.

Original drawing - 10 minutes - by Mayko
Original drawing – 15-20 minutes – by Mayko

 

 

Traced outline with pencil, muscles inserted with coloured pencil, based on muscle references. This exercise really helps the next time you draw a figure
Traced outline with pencil, muscles inserted with coloured pencil, based on muscle references. This exercise really helps the next time you draw a figure

The skeleton tells you about the structure you are looking at. The muscles give you the tension, relaxation, stretch and much of the sense of energy in the pose. Human muscles are layered and there are many of them in one body.

There’s no need to study all of them for life drawing purposes, but knowing the shapes and contortions of the major muscles that affect the body’s surface will help you to draw bodies  expressively.

We recommend 3 exercises to improve your knowledge of muscles for drawing:

1.     Touch and move –  develop your sense of ‘Kinesthesia’ Place your hand on a part of your body, for example your waist line with both hands, right arm pit with left hand etc, then move that part in many directions. Feel how the muscle there contributes to the movement and try to remember the sensation.

Then the next time you draw from a model or photo, try to sense the pose the model is making within your own body. This sensation relates to ‘kinesthesia’ – you gain an empathy with the model in terms of muscle. The effect is largely sub-conscious, and will give the drawing energy and life.

2.     The second exercise will require one of your finished drawings. You will need some tracing paper, or any paper as long as you can see through the drawing underneath, a graphite pencil , a coloured pencil of any colour, and some anatomical references (see the links provided below).

 

Fix the tracing paper over the drawing at the corners so that it won’t move. Trace the contour of your drawing with graphite carefully, especially where there are bumps or dents. Also trace major lines inside the drawing where there are noticeable changes of tones or bumps. Then take a coloured pencil and try to position the major muscles within the traced shape, referring to you anatomical diagrams. It’s not easy because the size and even shape of muscles vary depending on the person and their appearance will change greatly by pose as well as the angle of viewers.

Your aim is just to merge the anatomical diagram into your drawing as best you can. If you struggle with one body part, then pay close attention to that area during your next drawing. Or you can search for a similar pose among the old masters’ drawings (Michelangelo and Raphael in particular) and study them.

 

Here are examples of some drawings and the tracing paper muscle exercise:

Original drawing (10 minutes drawing a life drawing session)
Original drawing (35 minute drawing a life drawing session) by Mayko
Traced outline in pencil, muscle anatomy in coloured pencil inserted based on references
Traced outline in pencil, muscle anatomy in coloured pencil inserted based on references
Original drawing - 10 minutes during life drawing session - 10 minutes by Mayko
Original drawing – 10 minutes during life drawing session – 15 minutes by Mayko
Traced outline in pencil, then inserted major muscles using online muscle references
Traced outline in pencil, then inserted major muscles using online muscle references

3.     Now you will need a good sized version of a figure drawing by an old master of your choice. Again, we recommend Michelangelo and Raphael, but any master you admire would do, as long as the drawing has good muscular description. Go through the same process as exercise 2.

 

Muscle references: Fortunately, anatomical references are easy to find on the internet. Wikipedia’s muscular system pages are an excellent place to start. Inner body’s anatomy tool is also useful. We like the old school diagrams from Vesalius which you can freely access at this historical anatomies website. Vesalius gives you the important shapes of each muscle as part of the whole body in poses. It is therefore much easier to relate to in terms of life drawing.

Vesalius anatomy diagram -  back
Vesalius anatomy diagram – back

For exercises 2 and 3, these are the muscles you should pay particular attention to (you don’t need to learn the names, but pay attention to the shapes): Torso, front

Torso, back

Arms

Thigh and knee

Legs

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